The Sugarland Express (1974) Film Review by Gareth Rhodes

The Sugarland Express (1974) Directed by Steven Spielberg. With Goldie Hawn and William Atherton.

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There are shots and sequences in The Sugarland Express, in which we see the early genius of Steven Speilberg at work. Based on ‘true events’, Goldie Hawn plays Lou Jean, a not-so-laid-back southern gal intent on breaking her husband (William Atherton) out of a Texan correctional facility, so that together, they can reunite with your their young son.

The photography is sublime – whether its lines of police cars, wide-open sunset skies, or those small, incidental moments of humanity that Spielberg infuses, the film is held aloft by the innovation of its young director.

Away from the visuals, it is a skewed depiction of a mother’s love; a crazed kind of love which operates beyond the borders of rationality, irrespective of the cost to others. Lou Jean can be judged two ways. One way, she’s a desperate mother, cruelly and unjustly separated from her child, doing whatever she to get him back, because that’s her moral right, right!? Or, she’s a selfish idiot, risking other people’s lives because of her own poor life choices, as if the world owes her a favour. I’m leaning heavily towards the latter.

In a sense, you could rename the movie Dumb and Dumber: The Early Years, as our bumbling pair stumble from one crisis to the next, almost oblivious to the trail of chaos in their rear-view mirror. There is good humour, amid a sense that clouds are gathering for a final act reckoning.

Although it begins with a playful, road-movie demeanour, the overall tone is more Vanishing Point than Smokey and the Bandit. The script isn’t the finest that Spielberg has had to work with, but it does have things to say about some of the crazier aspects of the society it depicts; the gun-toting locals, the gun-toting police, and yes, the gun-toting perpetrators. In amongst it, you’re never quite sure who to root for, but you suspect that’s partly the point. 3.5/5

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About garethrhodes

Full-time lover of all things creative.
This entry was posted in Film Reviews, Steven Spielberg and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to The Sugarland Express (1974) Film Review by Gareth Rhodes

  1. Good one I missed that one or I do not remember this film at all. No I missed this one. But unfortunately it did not come to France fortunately when there is a will there a way. Nice review.

  2. Ricardo says:

    Steven Spielberg directed this??? Consider me surprised.
    Still won’t be seeing it.

    • garethrhodes says:

      Yes, an early one for him, but his innovative style shines through. Personally, I LOVE 1970’s road movies. Of course, it’s no Vanishing Point, but it does have good points of its own.

  3. Lloyd Marken says:

    This will be a fascinating film to finally see. For a while there it was so different from the films Spielberg and Goldie were known for.

    • garethrhodes says:

      Yes, knowing Goldie Hawn as the go-to star of a lot of light and forgettable 80’s and 90’s fare, it’s interesting to see her charms at play in a more divisive role.

  4. Chris Evans says:

    Saw this on tv a few years back, a fun enough watch and of interest if only to see one of Spielberg’s pre-Jaws efforts. Have you seen Duel? Now that is well worth seeing!

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