The Hangover Part III (2013) Film Review by Gareth Rhodes

The Hangover Part III (2013) Directed by Todd Phillips. With Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis , Ed Helms, Justin Bartha, Ken Jeong, John Goodman and Melissa McCarthy.

the-hangover-3

There is something almost tangibly depressing about The Hangover Part III. The mere fact that it exists, after the dreadfully prosaic ‘Part II’, suggests that it only does so – like many Hollywood threequels, because the numbers add up. Sadly, that suggestion is more accurate that you might imagine, while imagination is not something you’ll discover much of in this tedious delivery of Hollywood junk mail.

Curiously, this outing doesn’t feature an actual hangover, preferring instead to focus itself as the completion of a narrative arc from the first film, using an uninspired set-up involving Ken Jeong’s Mr. Chow and some stolen drug money (yawn). As luck wouldn’t have it, the ‘Wolfpack’ gets caught in a crossfire with John Goodman’s vengeful gangster and Mr. Chow, over the loot and it’s not long before our boys are back in Vegas trying to tie-up some old loose ends.

There’s no doubt that Bradley Cooper has a certain amount of screen presence, but here, he behaves like he’s honouring a contract, which in fairness, is a contract that gives him very little to do, other than to react to the behaviour of Zach Galifianakis’ Alan,  who is once again, the best presence in the film. Indeed, one scene with Alan and a cameo by the excellent Melissa McCarthy steals the entire show (which isn’t very hard) but also serves as a cold reminder of the films major failing. It’s nowhere near funny enough.

So, while it’s a relief that the formula isn’t once again repeated note-for-note, Part III is nevertheless an adolescent mess of a comedy, that has grossed hundreds of millions of dollars by being a crass, blunt edged piece of forgettable bin lining. Sadly, it’ll only encourage them to make more. 2/5

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About garethrhodes

Full-time lover of all things creative.
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