Cherry 2000 (1987) Film Review by Gareth Rhodes

Cherry 2000 (1987) Directed by Steve De Jarnatt. With Melanie Griffith, David Andrew and Pamela Gidley.

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Filmed in 1985, but shelved and not released on VHS until 1987, perhaps the most telling thing about Cherry 2000, is that its producer, Edward R. Pressman, reportedly confessed that the films distributors, Orion Pictures, were “stumped” by the films confusion of genres, which led to the long delay in its initial release.

Seeing it for the first time, it’s easy to see why it was such a marketing headache. For starters, it isn’t really any good, however, in being a crazy mish-mash of bits of everything, and having the good sense to never take itself too seriously, it’s hard to feel annoyed with it.

The film is set in the year 2020. Technology has progressed to the extent that it’s now possible to own a robot in the form of fully functional, supermodel, stay at home girlfriend (Cherry), who knows exactly how to treat her man – we never see male model counterparts. In the first scene, our lead character, Sam Tredwell, ( David Andrews) has a soapy, after dinner mishap with his own Cherry 2000 doll, which kick-starts the plot of him having to travel the wastelands of ‘Zone 7’, to find another one. Yes folks, it’s as ridiculous as it sounds. 

Co-starring with Andrews is a jaunty looking Melanie Griffith, who seems to be playing a female ‘Rambo’,  running and gunning her way through her scenes. Surprisingly, some of the stunt work, locations and set pieces are genuinely quite stunning, which makes it all the more a shame that the end result is such an elaborate mess.

Cherry 2000 is like Mad Max, but madder. It doesn’t really seem to know what it wants to be, and ends up being not much of anything. That said, there is fun to be salvaged amongst its bonkers sense of humour, and the people in it seem to be having a good time. A guilty pleasure for some, perhaps. 2/5

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About garethrhodes

Full-time lover of all things creative.
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